NSU continues efforts towards diversity with new ranking

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NSU has ranked 5th nationally for minorities with graduate degrees, according to “Diverse: Issues in Higher Education,” a critical news source that has been reporting on minorities in higher education since 1984. The study revealed that NSU is also 2nd in Hispanic graduates and 9th in African American graduates for all graduate-level degrees.

The data all comes from a federal database called the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System, or IPEDS.

According to Arie Spirgel, Senior Research Associate of Institutional Effectiveness, “Almost every college and university that you’ve heard of does have to report to IPEDS each year, we have to report the number of graduates.”

“We’re very proud of this ranking, and to be able to demonstrate to the community that we are, indeed, committed to diversity.”

-Donald Rudawski, Vice President of Institutional Effectiveness

This is where “Diverse: Issues in Higher Education” gets their information. The data is available to everyone, vetted, and thus of the highest quality. Spirgel explained that there are extreme consequences to any invalid or inaccurate reports.

As diversity is one of NSU’s core values, this rating comes as a prideful achievement in the community.

“We’re very proud of this ranking, and to be able to demonstrate to the community that we are, indeed, committed to diversity,” said Donald Rudawski, Vice President of Institutional Effectiveness, “and to assisting all of our students, including our minority students in not just enrolling, but also in completing degrees.”

Rudawski also points out that “Diverse: Issues in Higher Education’s” rating declares the quantity of degrees. While NSU would always like to improve their ranking, he explained that it’s better to focus on the quality of our programs rather than seeking to climb up a few more numbers. Regardless, the university is looking to maintain its status near the top of the list, if not improve it.

It is unlikely that this rating means many alterations are in store for NSU’s graduate programs, in terms of class size or content, however.

“I don’t anticipate that this means any changes are coming, it’s more an indicator of continued commitment to diversity,” said Rudawski.

This is not the only stride NSU is taking towards a diversified campus. According to NSU’s core values, diversity refers to, but is not limited to, “race, ethnicity, culture, religion, philosophy, gender, physical, socioeconomic status, age and sexual orientation.” The university frequently tries to improve its dedication to all of these concepts, according to Rudawski, and the recognition is proof of this effort.

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