Seriously Kidding: Shark to be added to Chinese zodiac animal list

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According to Global News Weekly Digest, the Chinese Authority on Calendars announce on Jan. 11 that the shark will be added to the Chinese zodiac animal list. The revelation came just a month before the new Chinese new year which begins on Feb. 16.

The changes will not take full-effect until next year when the shark replaces the pig, to represent the year of the shark in 2019. This hasn’t stopped NSU faculty, staff and students from seeing this as a win as cultures around the world begin to gravitate toward more aquatic animals, instead of terrestrial ones.

Pablo Idunno, professor of history of culture and animals in the F.Ake College of Natural Sciences at NSU, stated that this addition makes sense since the sharks have a lot of qualities that most animals on the traditional list in the zodiac do not.

“Sharks can be pretty fierce creatures but they are also very graceful,” said Idunno. I mean, take Razor, for example, looking at him, who wouldn’t want to be a Shark?”

Many NSU students seem to also hold a similar opinion as a petition has been started to have Razor become the face of the the new addition. Even though zodiac animals are celebrated all around the world, NSU will be the only college to have their mascot feature as an official zodiac animal if the Chinese Authority on Calendars selects Razor to be the face of the new shark.

“Sharks are fearless, and the feared are always moving forward in their lives,” said Sofia Dointoomuch, marine biology major and advocate for Razor.

“I can’t wait to see if we get get Razor to be the face of the new zodiac animal,” said Pree Dat, sophomore business administration major. “Who knows, this will probably increase school spirit, too! Wins all around!”

President Hanbury has already shown his support for the petition, saying in a statement, “NSU would be proud to have Razor the Shark be a part of the zodiac … such a rich Chinese tradition celebrated all around the world.”

NSU officials have also announced if Razor is selected to be the face of the new shark, NSU will begin offering a course that celebrates the change, as well as teaches students about the Chinese zodiac animals and their cultural significance.

“This course should be exciting for students and faculty since they will be learning more about sharks, but from an entirely different perspective,” said Notreal Smith, Director of Class Creation.

Enthusiasm for the introduction of such a class has been widely supported by staff and faculty of NSU. In fact, some have requested that the class be modified in order to still be offered in the event that Razor is not chosen. In the meantime, students are encouraged to sign the #Razor2019 petition which will be available in the UC Spine through Feb. 2.  

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