Seriously Kidding: NSU debuts social media platform Sharkchat

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The popular social media platform, Sharkchat, has taken NSU by storm. The app allows individuals to send completely private pictures to their acquaintances for up to 10 seconds and even incorporates a news section to boot. On NSU’s campus, it is common to see students so engrossed in their “Shark-chatting” that they sometimes walk straight into trees or poles as a result. Although the concussions are slightly unfortunate, the adoration students have for this social media platform is awe-inspiring.

One advantage of using this app is the total and complete privacy it assures. It’s not like the technologically innovative minds here at NSU can discreetly save the image appearing on their screen with various hacks. That’s unheard of, as the contents on Sharkchat, along with all social media sites, are 100 percent private.

Another vacancy that Sharkchat fills is the need to be connected with others 24/7 on and off campus. Thank goodness most people have anywhere from around 100-200 “streaks” where they spend only about 10 minutes performing the important task of sending attractive photos of themselves to the recipients on their streaks list.

Lexi Garcia, a junior biology major, stated she “finally cut her streaks down to an astonishingly low number of 400.” After all, the number of days spent pressing the “send” button to peers, has been shown to measure the validity of a friendship.  

Sharkchat is also an important tool in measuring the trust of a friend. This is evident in the case of Millie Hayes, a sophomore communication major.

Haye’s “ex-best friend,” Mayde Uppe, described the situation that caused their friendship to go down-hill: “Millie saved all of our secretive conversations and screenshotted photos of me showcasing my multiple chins,” said Uppe. “Thanks to Sharkchat, I now know Millie is not to be trusted.”

The app can also help students find out who their best friend is. The name at the top of the list is the individual’s best friend, and if you are also their best friend, then a yellow heart will appear by both of your names.

Freshman exercise science major Alexandra Hinge claimed, “Although I thought my best friend was my neighbor since second grade, now I know it’s the random guy who Sharkchats me daily in order to ‘get to know me better,’” said Hinge. “We even obtained a yellow heart.”

Although she might not know where her newly designated counterpart lives, she later said that she was grateful to have found her real best friend.  

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